Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Baby Bonnet: Or, An 1820s Cap

Done! I scored this amazing vintage whitework for the ruffle. It's a finer quality than the body of the cap, but you can't immediately tell.

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One more item done on the list. Next up is a bonnet and a turban. The turban should be super quick, and I don't anticipate the bonnet taking too terribly long, either. I'm going to do a gathered crown. It's perhaps not as common as a normal crown, but there are dozens of images of it in fashion plates for 1823-25.


From Journal des Dames et des Modes, available at http://digital.bunka.ac.jp/kichosho_e/


5 comments:

Sarah W said...

It's so sweet! I have always loved white, frilly caps, though they might be a bit silly. I'm currently working on an 1840's cap myself.

Kleidung um 1800 said...

It's beautiful...and a bit weird, like most of the garments of the late 1810s/1820s and early 1830s.
I'm so happy you've made up such cap, to which the modern eye needs getting used to, but wonderfully displays the period taste :)

Sabine

Gina said...

This is...FABULOUS!!! I love it! I hope I get to see it at Coco?
Blessings!
g

Scott B. Lesch said...

It's a fashion that should come back. I remember that it did appear briefly during the "Mod" era in the early 1960s.

Rowenna said...

So cute! And though 19th century caps aren't my forte, I've seen 18th century caps that seem to use a different weight of fabric for the ruffle than for the main body of the cap. So--even if it were obvious (which it isn't) I think you have historical precedent!